How to Effectively Create a Personalized Video

How to Effectively Create a Personalized Video


There are two types of personalized elements in any well crafted personalized video. The first is an obvious element that you want your viewer to recognize. The second is a subtle element that the viewer may not notice are personalized to them. It is important to have the correct balance between these two types of personalized elements. A correct balance allows the viewer to feel comfortable, but also engaged. So how do you identify subtle and obvious elements to be used and then balance them?

 

Obvious Personalization Elements

Obvious elements are the hardest to get right because they are by nature very personal. The rule of thumb is to use information that was provided openly by the viewer. An example is a video to a consumer that calls out their name and shoes that they recently purchased. The consumer purchased those shoes from the vendor and provided their name so it is not unreasonable to see that information. If on the other hand the video also includes the name of a coworker who also purchased the shoes, the viewer will wonder how that information was obtained. Here is a good and bad example of how this might translate into a face to face conversation:

 

Bad Example:

Customer: “Hi, my name is Jane and I would like a Latte”

Barista: “Thank you Jane! Did you know your boss Emma also likes Lattes?”

 

Good Example:

Customer: “Hi, my name is Jane and I would like a Latte”

Barista: “Thank you Jane, Lattes are our most popular drink so I will put your name on your cup for you!”

 

Subtle Personalization

In many cases, the subtle elements are what keep viewers subconsciously engaged. The advantage of subtle elements is that they can use information that was not explicitly provided by the viewer but rather gathered based on what they did provide. This information could be basic demographic information or more detail data gathered from social media. One way of using subtle personalization is by adjusting the gender, activities or location of the actors in a video to match the viewer’s preferences or demographics. An example would be to show a video of a female running on a trail next to an SUV for one person, and another person would see a video of a male running a marathon with a sports car in the background. By adjusting these subtle elements, the viewer subconsciously identifies with what they are watching and is more engaged. Here is another subtle and not so subtle example in the same coffee shop from earlier:

 

Not So Subtle Example:

Customer: “Hi, my name is Jane and I would like a Latte”

Barista: “Thank you Jane, Lattes are our most popular drink so I will put your name on your cup for you!” (Barista notices a pin and sticker from a non profit)

Barista: “I noticed that you support local non-profits, did you know that we also give to a local charity.”

 

Subtle Example:

Customer: “Hi, my name is Jane and I would like a Latte”

Barista: “Thank you Jane, Lattes are our most popular drink so I will put your name on your cup for you!” (Barista notices a pin and sticker from a non profit and specifically uses a cup with information about how the coffee shop donated money to a local charity.)

 

Balancing elements

The optimal balance of specific and subtle elements depend highly on the intended message and recipient. When there is a significant relationship with a viewer, then the balance should skew more towards the specific elements. The viewer understands that the video is coming from a trusted source and therefore is encouraged by the personalized experience. As expected, the reverse is true for newly formed relationships. Before trust is established, the balance should skew towards the subtle elements and focus on only one or two obvious elements from the information that has been explicitly provided.

As shown in this article, comparing video with face to face conversations is a useful tool in analyzing the level and balance of personalization. 


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